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Are 30-Year Fixed Mortgage Loans In Texas In Danger?

Worry or False Flag: Is the Popular 30 Year Fixed Mortgage Loan Going Away?

Part 1

The 30 year fixed mortgage has been a mainstay of home buyers for decades now, and for most people who don’t follow financial news or the markets it can be easy to believe it will be around forever. But is that true? While it’s not saying anything controversial to suggest this is the most well-known loan as far as terms and long-standing use, that doesn’t mean the model will stay viable forever.

Back in 2014 some fretting about the 30 year fixed mortgage because when Dick Bove made the attention gathering claim that the Fed’s decision to taper off purchasing mortgages would make those loans non-viable going on in the future. In other words, it might actually be curtains for this loan program – and that caught plenty of attention.

So Should We Kiss the 30-Year Fixed Mortgage Good-Bye?

There’s a lot of controversy over this idea. Seeing as how the terms and affordability of the 30 year fixed mortgage allowed home ownership to become so widespread, it’s kind of hard to imagine a modern lending world where this is not an option. Is this something to actually worry about, or is it just fear mongering and paranoia?

While only time will tell, it does seem that every few years speculation fires up about Fannie Mae & Freddie Mac. These agencies are government controlled and have been since the 2008 collapse. They have long been a necessary part of the economic process to back these loans and make them a viable option that banks are willing to embrace because of the backing that comes from those agencies. In other words, they play the “Middle Man” that allows the process to work smoothly.

However, Mark Calabria, the most recent nominee to become FHFA (Federal Housing Finance Agency) director may decide he doesn’t like government purchasing 30-year fixed mortgages. If the order comes to stop buying those loans, the un-doing of Fannie and Freddie could take place. These two organizations back the majority of all 30-year mortgages out there. When the market becomes far less liquid, the prices either shoot up or those type of loans will no longer be favored. This could push them to extinction over time.

This seems like a huge shift, and it would be, but it is very possible.

So If Not 30-Year, Then What?

If this happens then a likely spike in interest rates would make the current 30-year fixed mortgage loans far less competitive and thus far less appealing. Some think these massive shifts in interest rates or changes in interest could result in a shift to ARMs.

Without the stability and backing that Freddie & Fannie bring to the table, these don’t become the easy access good deals that homeowners have enjoyed in the past, and it makes them scarier investments.

If this situation was to play out, there’s a good chance that 5/1 ARM or 7/1 ARM loans would become about as attractive an option (or an even better option) than any new 30 year rate that would be made available. These could get even better if investment interest in 30-year fixed rate loans dried up after the changes. Banks won’t keep putting out loans that there’s no investment interest in.

While this would be a huge change, it is worth noting that the 30-year fixed mortgage is rare or a huge minority of home loans in many advanced economies like the UK, Ireland, the Netherlands, Canada, South Korea, and Spain. So other options are viable, even if the transition appears to be a bit rough at first glance.

Before making a decision, let one of the experts at The Texas Mortgage Pros help you find out exactly what loan is best for you.  Contact us today Or Call Us @ (866) 772-3802 Click here to go to the next article in this series.

FHA Flipping Rules

What You Need To Know About FHA Flipping

When you ignore a relatively unknown FHA flipping rule, you could be stopping a purchase where it stands. Property flipping is when an investor buys a house, makes some improvements and then sells it for a profit. If you have watched any HGTV, you will see that people can easily make a living from this.

However, there is a dark side to property flipping when looked at from the side of mortgage loans. This is particularly true with FHA. If you are a buyer, your lender and realtor should understand FHA flipping rules and guidelines. You should also know about this to ensure that you are on the safe side.

Explaining FHA Flipping Rules

A property flip is defined by mortgage lenders as a home that has been owned for a short period of time and then sold for a sizeable profit. FHA and other lending agents care about this because of the possible fraud which is linked to it. Of course, it is important to remember that this is a possible fraud.

Most of the property flips will be completely legitimate. However, when a property has a significant increase in value with almost nothing being done to it, everything becomes a bit suspicious. There are also many flipping schemes which include key parties in the mortgage, appraising and other industries which use false information to endure that purchases work.

Most of the concerns relate to the value of the property or straw buyers. A straw buyer is one who buys with no intention of living in the property. They will often buy the property at an inflated cost to create a profit for the seller. These are some of the reasons why FHA has created flipping rules.

HUD has broken the FHA flipping rules into 2 time periods. These are ownership of fewer than 90 days and ownership between 91 and 180 days.

To determine the time period of ownership, the clock will start on the deed recording date which is the sate when the seller stakes ownership. The next important date will be the date on the signed purchase agreement along with the date of FHA case file assignment. To clear the initial flip date requirement, the signed contract date and the case file ID will need to be assigned 91 days after the deed recording date. In order to clear the second flip rule period, the purchase agreement date and the FHA case number will need to be assigned 180 days later.

FHA 90 Day Flip Rule

The most restrictive of the established date ranges is the less than 90-day one. In these situations, FHA will not allow any financing of homes which are flipped in less than 90 days after the deed recording date. When there is no FHA insurance, a loan will be impossible. Of course, there are some sellers and transactions which are excluded from this rule and you need to be aware of this.

FHA 91-180 Days Flip Rule

If the property has already cleared the 90-day rule, it could still fall into the next rule time period. During this second time period, the sale of a property for FHA financing is allowed. However, there is a possible second appraisal requirement that may have to be met. The FHA will also not allow the buyer to pay for this.

The second appraisal will be required when certain conditions occur. This will be when the sale price is 100% or more than the price paid by the seller. If a higher priced loan is required and the purchase price is 20% more than the seller’s purchase price, a second appraisal is required.

An example of this will be a house which was purchased for $100,000. If this house is then sold for $200,000, a second appraisal is needed. The mortgage lender will determine the last requirement.

Preventing Appraisal Delays And Additional Costs

The Second Appraisal

In regards to the second appraisal, there are some FHA rules to know about:

  • This will need to be done by a different appraiser
  • Documentation must be included that support the increased value
  • The buyer cannot pay for this
  • A lower value will be used if the second appraisal is 5% lower than the original one
  • The lender must have a 12-month chain of title documenting resales

The FHA may require additional documentation including a second appraisal if the sale occurs between 91 and 365 days after purchase. This will also occur when the resale price is 5% or more than the lowest sale price of the property within the last 12 months. This is very rare, but it can happen.

FHA Flipping Rule Exceptions

It is important to note that there is a possibility of skipping these guidelines. There are certain transactions which are excluded from the FHA flip rules that you need to know about:

  • The property has been acquired by a relocation agency or employer in connection with the relocation of an employee
  • A resale by HUD under the real estate owned program
  • A sale by other government agencies of single-family properties via programs which are run by the agencies
  • The sale of property by a nonprofit which is approved to buy HUD-owned properties at a discount with resale restrictions
  • The sale of a property acquired through an inheritance
  • The sale of a property by a federally or state-chartered financial institute
  • The sale of a property by a state or local government agency
  • The sale of a property in a declared major disaster area upon issuance of a notice of exception from HUD

These restrictions will not apply to a builder selling any newly built properties or when buying a house for a borrower who is planning to use FHA-insured funding. All of these exceptions can be found in the FHA flipping regulations.

Other Loan Options For Flipped Properties

It is important to note that these rules only apply to FHA loans. A buyer who qualifies for other loan products could get financing even in these cases. There are a number of other loan types that can be considered such as:

These other loan options will not have the same flipping rules, but they will generally pay closer attention to the transaction if a short ownership period is in play. Underwriters will verify the length of the transactions. They will also review the appraisal thoroughly to ensure that the home actually matches the value.

Documentation Related To FHA Flipping

You might be wondering if a buyer can start the process of qualification while not being under contract. The answer is we, but if you want the purchase a flipped home, the date of the contract can cause flipping restrictions. To start the review process, the following documents should be prepared:

  • Buyer pre-approval
  • A copy of the recorded deed
  • A list of the improvements made to the property
  • An executed purchase agreement

Facts About Fixed Rate Mortgages And How They Work

For the average person buying a home is exciting and fun. It’s figuring out how to get it financed that is not as much fun. Housing prices and the rates on mortgages vary overtime but a buyer can rely on a fixed rate mortgage to not fluctuate.

What Are Fixed Rate Mortgages?

This type of mortgage is simply one where the interest rate always stays the same amount over the life of the loan. This means that how much you pay each month and the amount of interest that is applied to it will always be the same. The one exception to this is if your homeowner’s insurance or property tax rates change then it could impact your monthly payments. For the average homeowner, a fixed rate mortgage is the most ideal because it’s stable and predictable.

In most situations, a fixed rate mortgage will have a higher interest rate than an adjustable-rate will initially. But ARMs are only lower initially in most cases and then after a certain period of time such as three, five, or seven years, the interest rate goes up. Once that initial period is up, the rate can fluctuate as can your monthly payments and that fluctuation can take place over the remainder of the loan. There are some limits to the fluctuation as most ARMs do have a cap.

The Most Common Mortgages Available Are Either An Adjustable Rate Mortgage Or A Fixed Rate Mortgage

A typical fixed rate mortgage will come with the option of choosing how long you finance for and this can range from 10 to 30 years. The interest rate itself will always stay the same regardless of how long the mortgage is for. Because this is so much more stable it is the preferred type of mortgage for the average homeowner.

The rate of interest paid on an adjustable rate mortgage will fluctuate overtime during the course of the loan. An ARM has its interest rate based on a margin and this is what determines what you pay in interest any given month. The spread remains the same but what causes the fluctuation is the fact that the index changes.

The loan will be adjusted regularly and those changes are based on the terms of the mortgage. When the interest rates increase the borrower will have to pay more and they will need to put that extra amount in their budget to meet the higher payment. A borrower doesn’t need to make this type of adjustment when they have a fixed rate mortgage because it will always stay the same. The one drawback is that they also won’t get the advantage of having their payments go down if interest rates go down unless they refinance.

The fixed rate mortgage can increase if the borrower places property tax and homeowners insurance in escrow. This is due to the fact that insurance and taxes will sometimes go up. This is not the interest rate fluctuating that causes the increase but only the fact that the cost of insurance and taxes went up.

How Long Does It Take To Repay A Fixed Rate Mortgage?

The term of the mortgage is what determines how many years it will take to repay the loan. The most common fixed rate mortgages are either 15 or 30 years. Here are some of the pros and cons to consider with each of these options.

30 Year Mortgage

The biggest pro when it comes to a 30-year fixed-rate mortgage is the fact that the monthly payments can be considerably lower than they will be with a shorter-term mortgage. The drawback to this option is the fact that over the life of the loan you will pay a lot more interest than you would with a shorter-term mortgage. The interest rate is usually more for this type of mortgage as well.

15 Year Mortgage

The pros of this mortgage include the fact that you will pay less interest because it is a shorter term and the interest rate itself will be lower. The reason why more homeowners don’t take advantage of this choice is the fact that the monthly payments are higher.

For most borrowers, the 30-year fixed-rate mortgage is preferable over the 15-year loan simply because the payments are lower. When you go with a longer-term it usually means you can borrow more money. For some homeowners, it means that they can have an additional monthly cash flow that can be applied to other things including emergency savings, children’s college tuition, and other priorities.

For those who have the extra cash flow, the 15-year mortgage may be the better choice because they’ll pay off their home faster and the interest rate will be lower. Because you’re repaying more of the principal it means your overall monthly payments will be higher and this means you’ll need to make certain it’s something you can afford together with other financial goals you have.

Understanding The Difference In Mortgage Lengths

If Jane is a first-time home buyer and she has a tight budget then the length of time she chooses for the mortgage can determine how much she can borrow. If as an example she feels that she can afford $1,000 a month then she may be able to get a payment close to that but the length of the loan will determine how much she can get. If Jane chooses a 30-year fixed mortgage with an interest rate of 4.5% then she can get a $200,000 house and her payment will be $1,013.

If she chooses a 15-year mortgage then the interest rate might be 4% and this would mean for the same monthly payment she would only be able to get a home that was $137,000. This means that if she goes with a 30-year fixed loan she will be able to borrow an extra $63,000 while maintaining the same monthly payment. Of course in that situation, she would pay more interest.

If Jane decides to borrow $200,000 on a 30-year fixed mortgage at four and a half percent then she will pay $164,813 in interest over those 30 years. If on the other hand, she goes with the 15-year mortgage at 4% then she will pay only $66,288 in interest over the mortgage. That means she will save $98,525.

Compare Rates

There are always a number of options that you’ll want to consider. It’s best that you understand exactly how much you’ll be paying in principal and interest and this can easily be done using a mortgage calculator. Obviously, a lender will be more open to offering a competitive rate and terms to those who have a stronger credit history.

Before making a decision,k let one of the experts at The Texas Mortgage Pros help you find out exactly what loan is best for you.  Contact us today Or Call Us @ (866) 772-3802